Declaring IPv4 Historic

I’ve posted a new internet-draft, “IPv4 Declared Historic”. I thought I would describe the document, and why I chose to say what I said. First, the definition of historic: A specification that has been superseded by a more recent specification or is for any other reason considered to be obsolete is assigned to the “Historic” level. […]

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Define “Runout”

This week, ARIN allocated another /12, bringing their inventory to less than half of a /8. Since they allocate based on 3-month need, this is “Last Call” for allocations. My friend @toreanderson pointed out that runout date varies based on the size block you need–something I’ve noted before, but haven’t detailed. So I built a spreadsheet. What if […]

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IPv6 is Faster

A couple of weeks ago, I ran a panel at NANOG60 about the IPv6 Performance Bonus. First, Geoff Huston showed some results from his experiments. He buys Google ads which run a bit of code, telling the browser to fetch a v6-only object and a v4-only object, and compares the times. He notes that in IPv4, a host will send […]

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IPv6 for Consumers

Whenever a group of people talks about IPv6, eventually one of them says, “What we really need is a killer app, something that will get consumers to want IPv6.” I disagree with this. As a technology transition, if you’re waiting for consumers to ask, you’re doing it wrong. I’ve pointed out what I think are […]

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Record of Transfers in the ARIN Region

One of the wonderful things about ARIN is that they provide so much data. Here, from their list of specified transfers is a list of all transfers effected through ARIN, to date. IPv4 Block Transfer Date Buyer Seller #Addresses 204.16.240.0/21 Oct-09 TeraSwitch Nortel 2,048 216.243.96.0/20 Nov-09 Lobo Internet Services 4,096 198.32.100.0/22 Dec-09 Equinix EP.net 1,024 198.32.104.0/21 Dec-09 […]

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